Igby

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“I sometimes get asked: “How come the men in your stories don’t have such strong characters?” And I’m like: “I don’t care.” I just want to find out about all the different lives a woman can live. But my feminism has never been against men. It’s not erasure; it’s just they’re not the focus. In real life, they’re quite nice.”

—   Helen Oyeyemi responding to the question “Do you prefer to write about women?” in this interview.

guardian:

Do you organise the books in your bookshelf alphabetically or by the colour of the sleeves? Possibly not. But Canadian ad man Sean Ohlenkamp and his wife do, and filmed the results using stop-frame animation to make a charming video. Now they have gone one stage further and rearranged the titles in a Toronto bookshop at night. The results are truly magical – books dance around the shelves, colours change and the shop comes to life. There are some witty nods to Tim Burton, Michel Gondry and Pantone colour charts in there, and it all goes to show, as it says at the end, “There’s nothing quite like a real book”.

Find out what else reached the Guardian viral video chart here.

(Source: )

The Guardian is celebrating its 190th anniversary with an alternative homepage that looks like the paper’s first print edition in 1821. Very cute.
Guardian’s Patrick Kingsley investigates the flipback, a new print book format that combines the conveniences of e-readers (lightweight) and the pleasures of print books (feel of paper, smell).
Innovation or gimmick?

Guardian’s Patrick Kingsley investigates the flipback, a new print book format that combines the conveniences of e-readers (lightweight) and the pleasures of print books (feel of paper, smell).

Innovation or gimmick?

“… I hate Hemingway. His gratingly self-conscious style – all brutalised declarative sentences – has, to my ears, the rhythm of a pub bore sounding off. More repugnant than his style is his mentality. He is the literary version of the worst of Bob Dylan, purveying that tired cliche of a man as solitary figure, necessarily selfish and the sole protagonist of his story, for whom women are either spoilt sluts or sweet saints, there to look pretty, subjugate themselves and then, eventually, be left behind so he can find another girl in another town wearing a lace dress. It’s such a boring, sophomoric view, one almost excusable in a twentysomething man, less so in a fiftysomething, and it explains why, in my experience, so many men love Hemingway (and Dylan, come to that). And why I don’t.”

—   Hadley Freeman in Guardian UK, on being named after Hemingway’s first wife.
I don’t quite get why, but here is a dress made from the pages of Daphne du Maurier’s masterpiece, Rebecca.
[Pic via Guardian Books]

“The Kindle is, in other words, what Marshall McLuhan referred to as a “horseless carriage”, the term first given to automobiles – in other words, an in-between stage on the way to a technological leap that we haven’t quite grasped yet. The Kindle’s one-dimensionality is strategic, but it is also short-sighted. Everything is pointing to the likelihood that the book will be absorbed into a multimedia world in which we switch from text to video to the internet in quick succession – some even believe all at the same time.”

The Kindle travels well: won't weigh you down, won't give you back ache.

James Patterson made $70 million in a year peddling airport thrillers.

He also signed a contract last year to complete 17 books by the end of 2012. If you’re able to, I guess why not…